Events

The Carlos Avery Wildlife Survey, Apr 4 & 5

posted Apr 1, 2020, 3:03 PM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Apr 1, 2020, 3:11 PM ]

It's time for the Cedar Creek Carlos Avery Wildlife Survey!


By executive order, Govern Waltz is asking all Minnesotans to stay in our homes through April 10 except to engage in specific activities. These include "outdoor activities," such as "walking, hiking, [...] hunting, or fishing." Or tracking? You bet.

Our Spring Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey was scheduled for this coming Saturday, April 4. Well, Cedar Creek is closed, and we all want to maintain social distancing. So I invite you to take part in our first asynchronous tracking club event, the Carlos Avery Wildlife Survey. Here is a quick overview:


Here are all the details:


Carlos Avery: Where To Go

The Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area covers about 24,000 acres to the south and east of Cedar Creek. It is about 2/3 wetland and 1/3 upland and is managed primarily for Deer, Waterfowl and Turkey.

Interior roads at Carlos Avery are now closed to motor vehicle traffic in the spring. Walk-in and non-motorized bicycle access is allowed. There are parking areas located all around the perimeter of the Wildlife Management Area. You can download a PDF map that shows parking locations here.

Any of the roads or upland habitat at Carlos Avery can offer good opportunities to explore sign. Many of the roads have sections of loose dirt or sand that capture clear tracks. Here are a few specific locations that some of our trackers have suggested:
  • Pool 23 Trail: Parking at trailhead. This is a dirt and sand two-track located just off Viking Blvd. It extends for about a mile though mixed forest and along wetlands. View here on Google Maps.
  • Near the DNR Offices: Trailheads near parking. From the Carlos Avery WMA Headquarters, you can cross Broadway Ave and follow the South Rd, which makes a nearly 7 mi loop. The surface is a mix of gravel, sand and dirt, some of which should offer good track traps. Old Gamefarm Rd heads north, offering an out-and-back (or very long loop). View here on Google Maps.
  • Swamp Trail: Trailhead is 1.2mi from the nearest parking. From Stonebridge Rd, you can pass through the gate and follow this two-track south. The first quarter mile or so is sand, and often captures a good diversity of tracks. Another quarter mile on, the road passes by a spillway with beaver and otter sign before reaching pine thicket. View here on Google Maps.
  • Peaceful Canyon: Trailhead is 2.4mi from the nearest parking. Though "just" a sandpit, Blake Southard of North Winds Wilderness School Though tells us he has taught his entire introduction to tracking course in this spot. It offers great substrate and good animal diversity and activity. View here on Google Maps.


Hazards, Considerations & Conditions on the Ground

Two-thirds of Carlos Avery is wetland. While the roads are usually well drained, you may encounter deep puddles in some places--especially with rain forecast for the next two days. Plan you footwear accordingly.

Ticks out and Anoka county is considered high-risk areas for tick-born diseases. Please come prepared and plan to do a thorough tick-check when you get home. Most experts now recommend permethrin treated clothing and a DEET based insect repellent, in addition to daily tick-checks. For more information on protecting yourself from Lyme disease and other tick-born illnesses check out this page from the Minnesota Department of Health.

Migrating waterfowl are passing through, and Carlos Avery can be a prime spot for birding. You may want to bring binoculars and think about how to share bird observations on iNaturalist. Maybe time to try digiscoping?



iNaturalist (please read this part)

As most of you know, we use iNaturalist as a tool for recording and sharing our observations. This platform will be even more valuable for this survey as we get out on our own and make individual observations. If you do not already have an iNaturalist account, you can get one here.

For this survey, our iNaturalist observations are not only a record of what we find, they are also the way we will be able to discuss what we see and get others help with identification and interpretation. Because of this, we will want to document our findings more thoroughly than we may be used to. Here are a few tips:

  • When we track, we use clues at multiple spatial scales to help us identify and interpret what we find. Make sure to document multiple scales. A good observation of tracks will include multiple, clear, in-focus photographs of:
    • Individual tracks with a ruler for scale
    • Groups of tracks, showing enough to clearly interpret the track pattern.
    • Context photos showing the habitat and how the animal is using that habitat
    • For an excellent example of documenting tracks, see this Facebook post by German naturalist Simone Roters.
    • These examples of bobcat, toad and chipmunk tracks on iNaturalist show how to document tracks and trails--but remember to add habitat shots as well.
  • When documenting sign, also take multiple, in-focus photographs of the sign at multiple scales, including the habitat. Context is often even more important for sign.
    • These examples of squirrel and mouse feeding sing on iNaturalist are great examples of how to document sign.
  • In addition to your photographs, include notes about your observation to help others interpret what they see in your photographs. You may want to include measurements of tracks and trail parameters or notes about behavior.
  • When photographing tracks, remember these basic tips:
    • Make sure the outline of the track is clearly visible. In full sunshine, you may need to shade the track. In flat light, you may need to side-light the track with a flashlight.
    • Try different exposures and lighting conditions. You can delete the poor photos later, once you see how things look on a full-sized screen.
    • Take photos straight down. Even a slight angle can distort features and apparent size.
    • Include a ruler. Even then, your hand won't be the same distance from your lens as the track, distorting the apparent size of the track.
    • Use popsicle sticks, sticks, or arrows in the dirt to help point out track patterns if tracks are small or faint in the frame.
  • Remember that you can take photographs with any camera and add them to iNaturalist once you are back home. I often take a placeholder observation on my phone and additional photos with a camera to show added detail.


Story-of-the-Day on Zoom

At the end of the weekend, you are invited to join us on a Zoom video conference to share your story of the day, ask and answer questions, and see what others found. We will gather on Sunday afternoon, so everyone will have time to do some of their own research, upload observations, and even get feedback from others on iNaturalists. Many of our team leads will be reviewing observations on Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon. Here are all the details on the gathering

Sunday, April 5, 4:00 PM

We recommend registering for the gathering in advance. To register, follow this link.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.



CyberTracker Evaluations 2020

posted Mar 10, 2020, 12:34 PM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Apr 1, 2020, 12:10 PM ]

Due to the current coronavirus outbreak, plans for hosting a CyberTracker Track & Sign evaluation this year are on hold.  We have cancelled our Specialist Evaluation, scheduled for Memorial Day Weekend, and are waiting to make a decision about our standard evaluation scheduled for Labor Day Weekend.

Registration is open for our September evaluation--and we will provide 100% refunds if we cancel the evaluation due to the pandemic.

About Track & Sign Evaluations

These two-day long Master Classes in track and sign interpretation are led by some of the finest wildlife tracking instructors in North America. These evaluations are one of the best ways to speed up your learning process, advance your skills, and help you gauge your current level of expertise as a tracker. No prior training is required to participate.


Track & Sign Specialist Evaluation

Specialist Evaluations are designed with experienced trackers in mind. Questions focus on the tracks of small or rare species, partial footprints, and indistinct tracks and sign that may require considerable experience to identify. The evaluation is led by two instructors, offering participants more evaluator contact and exposure to an even greater depth of knowledge and perspectives. For the experienced tracker, there is simply no better opportunity to move your skills forward than a Specialist Evaluation.

Cost: $385


Track & Sign Evaluation

September 5-6

On Labor Day weekend, we will host a Standard Track & Sign Evaluation. Standard evaluations are ideal for all levels of trackers, from novice to professional. Questions range from the clearest and most familiar tracks and sign of common animals all the way to obscure sign, partial prints, and the tracks of small or rare species. The evaluator debriefs each question, making sure all the participant don't just know the answer, but understand exactly why that is the answer. The evaluation will be led by Marcus Reynerson.

Cost $275


Registration

Registration is open for both evaluations. To register, Contact Us and submit a full payment to Minnesota Wildlife Tracking Project. You are registered for an evaluation when we receive your payment. Because of up-front the costs associated with hosting evaluators, registrations are transferable but not refundable. If you are unable to attend an evaluation you have registered for, we may only be able to offer a refund if we can fill your spot.

Mail payment to
Jonathan Poppele
846 Clear Ave
St. Paul, MN 55106


Evaluators

Casey McFarland is one of the most senior CyberTracker Evaluators in the US and currently sits as President of CyberTracker North America. He has run over 130 Evaluations in 8 countries and 14 US states and was integral to the establishment CyberTracker Europe. Casey is co-author of the forthcoming Peterson Field Guide to North American Bird Nests (Houghton Mifflin summer 2021) and Bird Feathers: A Guide to North American Species (Stackpole 2010), and a contributing author to Mammal Tracks and Sign: A Guide to North American Species (2nd Ed).

Marcus Reynerson is engaged in telling stories that bring to life the complexity of the ways humans are currently living in the 21st century. He was the Associate Producer of the conservation documentary Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest and a contributing author for Caribou Rainforest by Braided River Press. Born in south Louisiana and raised in Kentucky, Marcus currently lives in the Snoqualmie Valley in Washington State, just east of Seattle where he is the Lead Instructor for an internationally renowned environmental leadership program for adults at the Wilderness Awareness School.


The Location

Evaluations will be held in and around Ft. Snelling State Park. Located in a metropolitan are of over 1 million people, Ft. Snelling boasts remarkable wildlife activity and diversity. The Minnesota Wildlife Tracking Project hosts our monthly Tracking Club at Ft. Snelling, and have recorded the tracks and sign of over 20 species of mammals there including otter, mink, weasel, skunk, fox, opossum, and at least four species of tree climbing squirrels.

Cedar Creek Spring Survey: *CANCELED*

posted Feb 24, 2020, 11:19 AM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Apr 1, 2020, 12:41 PM ]

**In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, The University of Minnesota has canceled all public events and non-essential research activity at Cedar Creek through the month of May**


**We are cancelling our April 4 survey and look forward to returning to Cedar Creek when the University reopens it for regular research activity**


It's time for the Spring Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey   

The Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey is a joint venture between the Minnesota Wildlife Tracking Project and the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve. It is a unique opportunity to improve your tracking skills, connect with nature, and help Cedar Creek scientists learn about the wildlife living on their property. You can read about our Winter Survey here.


Saturday, April 4

View on Google Calendar
Our Spring Survey will be an all day affair. We will head out in teams to survey the roads and trails for animal tracks, then come back in to share our discoveries with one another. Each team will be led by an experienced wildlife tracker, certified in Track & Sign identification. In past years, conditions during our spring surveys have ranged from completely bare ground to several inches of fresh snow. Either way, Cedar Creek offers great substrate for getting a window into the lives of the wildlife living on the reserve. With the bison enclosure still vacant for the season, we have a broader range of places we can roam. Who knows what we will find? Here is the schedule for the day:

9:00am    Gathering at Lindman Center
9:30am    Tracking teams leave for the field
~3:00pm  Return from the field for sharing, mapping and debriefing
4:30pm    Complete


Bring your own lunches and snacks. Weather permitting, some teams may eat lunch in the field. Cedar Creek will provide coffee and snacks in the morning.


New to Tracking?

Trackers, naturalists and enthusiasts of all levels are welcome to take part in our surveys--and having some experience with track and sign interpretation is definitely helpful. If you are new to wildlife tracking and would like to learn a bit about it before joining us for a survey, join us for Tracking Club on March 15 at Ft. Snelling State Park. Get all the details here.


Registration

Registration is required. To register, email Jonathan Poppele <poppele@umn.edu> or use our contact form.

Use this link to add the event to a Google Calendar.


Want to Carpool?

We have a new tool to help coordinate carpooling. If you would like to share the trip to Cedar Creek, you can use our Group Carpool page to offer or request a ride.

Bring Your Questions

In recent surveys, our teams have identified the tracks of about 30 species including black bear, fisher, mink, red fox and grey wolf. We have been noting the behavior of deer, coyote and fox in relation to the shifting wolf population, and seeing some of our sightings verified by Cedar Creek's new network of trail cameras. And the more we learn about this landscape, the more questions arise. Some of the questions that came up after our winter survey include:
  • The deer population seemed to spike this winter, perhaps in response to a large mast crop of acorns. How did this influx of large herbivores affect other wildlife? Has there been more food on the landscape for scavengers than in a typical winter? Has this affected the movements of the foxes, coyote and fisher? Will it have an impact on the black bear's behavior as they come out of hibernation?
  • Have the deer dispersed now that other food is available in the surrounding landscape? Might this dispersal affect the wolf's behavior? Or that of the scavengers?

What questions do you have about the landscape, the animals and their behavior? We will take some time to share questions before we head out into the field.


About Cedar Creek

Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve is a 5,400 acre experimental ecological reserve operated by the University of Minnesota. It is located about 35 miles north of Minneapolis and St. Paul, just east of Bethel.

Cedar Creek lies at the boundary between prairie and forest. It is a mosaic of uplands dominated by oak savanna, prairie, hardwood forest, pine forests, and abandoned agricultural fields and of lowlands comprised of ash and cedar swamps, acid bogs, marshes, and sedge meadows. The area was first set aside in the early 1940s to be kept in its natural condition for scientific and educational purposes. Much of the land remains pristine, and has never been developed for agriculture. You can learn more at www.cedarcreek.umn.edu

The diverse, pristine habitat supports a wide variety of mammals. Species seen on the property over the Reserve's 75 year history include white-tailed jackrabbits, badger, fisher, fox squirrels, porcupine & spotted skunks. Reserve staff and scientists are looking for our help to update their index of mammals. If you are a beginner, the surveys will offer an overview of the diversity of Minnesota Mammals. For the advanced tracker, you might get to try your hand at distinguishing fisher from otter; fox squirrel from grey squirrel; and a variety of tiny mammal tracks. You can take a look at some of what our tracking teams have found on our iNaturalist Project Page, or look read about our past surveys on our blog.

The property includes 25 miles of sand roads, which catch tracks beautifully. The roads will be grated shortly before our surveys, offering optimal tracking conditions for us to locate and identify a rich diversity of species.

Public access to the Reserve is limited. The Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey program offers you the rare opportunity to explore this exceptional landscape.


Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve
2660 Fawn Lake Dr NE
Bethel, Minnesota 55005


For a map & directions to Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, click here

Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve

March Tracking Club: Signs of Spring: Sun Mar 15

posted Feb 24, 2020, 10:32 AM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Feb 24, 2020, 2:17 PM ]

Come join us for our next Tracking Club at Ft. Snelling State Park:

Sunday, March 15
9:00am - 1:00pm

We will gather at the Ft. Snelling State Park visitor center:

Ft. Snelling State Park
101 Snelling Lake Rd
West St Paul, MN 55111


The sun is climbing higher in the sky, the snow is melting, and the Spring Equinox is just around the corner. How are the animals shifting their behavior as warm weather returns? Have the woodchuck come out of hibernation? Are the deer finding early spring growth to feed on?
We will head out onto the landscape and look for signs of spring.

This is an all-weather event and we spend time off trail. Please bring appropriate footwear and dress for several hours outdoors in whatever weather we may have that day.

We will gather at 9:00 in the fireplace room in the Visitor Center. We will head out on the trail about 9:20 and return to the visitor center about noon to wrap-up and share stories. If you need to reach us the day of the outing, please call Jon's cell phone at 612-388-4700.

Note that you need a State Park pass to drive to the Visitor Center, but you can park for free at the Historic Fort Snelling visitor center. It is about a half-mile walk past the historic fort and down the hill to get to the State Park visitor center. The Historic Fort parking is located at 200 Tower Ave, St Paul, MN 55111

RSVPs are encouraged, but not required.

Click Here for Directions

Ft. Snelling Visitor Center



Trailing Practice at Cedar Creek: Sat, Mar 14

posted Feb 24, 2020, 8:44 AM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Feb 24, 2020, 8:44 AM ]

This month's trailing practice will once again be at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve. Our plan is to look for carnivore trails to follow. As we know from our wildlife tracking surveys, Cedar Creek supports a diversity of carnivores including coyotes, foxes, fisher and, at least some of the time, a wolf. If snow conditions are favorable, we will follow fresh carnivore trails to get a sense of how the animal is using the landscape.

Saturday, March 14
9:00 am - 1:00 pm

We will meet in Lindeman Lab
Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve
2660 Fawn Lake Dr NE, Bethel, Minnesota 55005


Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve is a 5,400 acre experimental ecological reserve operated by the University of Minnesota. It is located about 35 miles north of Minneapolis and St. Paul, just east of Bethel. Laying at the boundary between prairie and forest, Cedar Creek is a mosaic of uplands dominated by oak savanna, prairie, hardwood forest, pine forests, and abandoned agricultural fields and of lowlands comprised of ash and cedar swamps, acid bogs, marshes, and sedge meadows.

This is an all-weather event and we spend time off trail, perhaps literally walking on thin ice. Please bring appropriate gear and dress for several hours outdoors in whatever weather we may have that day.

We will gather at 9:00 at Lindeman Lab do our welcomes and get organized before heading out on the trail. If you need to reach us the day of the outing, please call Jon's cell at 612-388-4700. Please note that cell reception may be spotty and I will have my phone on silent once we are on a trail.

RSVPs are encouraged.

For a map & directions to Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, click here

Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve





March Bird Language Gathering

posted Feb 11, 2020, 5:59 PM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Feb 12, 2020, 10:17 AM ]

Please join us for our next Bird Language Gathering 

Sunday, March 1
9:00 - 12:00

Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center
3815 American Blvd E
Bloomington, MN 55425

Registration for these gatherings is encouraged, but not required. Feel free to drop by--and it would be great to know that you are coming!

Birds talk to each other. We can learn to understand it. And it's fun!

March is the beginning of meteorological spring, when some migrant and resident songbirds are just beginning to stake out territories. Meanwhile, the owls are well into their nesting season and keeping the songbirds on alert. Come join us on the slopes of the Minnesota River Valley to see what the birds are saying about this year's transition from winter to spring.


What should I bring?

Bring what you need to be comfortable sitting still, outside on the ground for an extended period of time—perhaps as long as an hour. You will also need something to take notes on. You do not need to have binoculars, but there is no harm in bringing a pair if you would like. Here are a few recommended and optional items to bring:

Recommended:

Note pad & pencil
Ground cloth, blanket or camp-chair
Appropriate clothing for sitting still outside
Sun protection
Poncho if it is raining

Optional:
Water bottle
Snack
Binoculars

Sign me up!

Registration is encouraged, but not required. Feel free to drop in and join us—and it would be great to know you are coming! If you have any questions, or to register for the event:

For a map & directions click here

Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge



Bemidji Wildlife Survey: Sat, Feb 29

posted Feb 11, 2020, 5:59 PM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Feb 11, 2020, 6:00 PM ]

The Bemidji State University chapter of the Wildlife Society is hosting its second Hobson Forest Wildlife Tracking Survey at the end of February. The survey is organized by Kim Shelton, president of the BSU Wildlife Society and Minnesota's first certified Track & Sign Professional. The first Hobson Forest survey on December 7, 2019, was a wonderful day in the field. BSU students led by certified trackers identified the tracks and trails of over 20 species, including black bear, fisher and five different species of canine. You can see what the teams found on the Hobson Forest iNaturailst project page.

The survey will take place on Saturday, February 29. Leap-Day 2020.

A group from the Twin Cities will be heading up to join the local trackers and BSU students for the February survey. Kim has offered to host our group--as long as we don't mind space on a sofa. We will carpool up on Friday, February 28, and head back on the evening of February 29 after the survey.

If you would like to take part in the survey, please let us know. If you are in the Bemidji area, email Kim Shelton. If you are coming from near the Twin Cities and would like to be part of our carpool, please Contact Us or email Jonathan Poppele.

February Tracking Club: Otter Find 'em

posted Jan 22, 2020, 11:18 AM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Feb 12, 2020, 10:28 AM ]

Come join us for our next Tracking Excursion at Ft. Snelling State Park:

Sunday, February 16
9:00am - 1:00pm

We will gather at the Ft. Snelling State Park visitor center:

Ft. Snelling State Park
101 Snelling Lake Rd
West St Paul, MN 55111


North American River Otters are just plain fun to track. That they are also good indicator of the health of an aquatic ecosystem. Since 2009, the National Park Service has been conducting track and sign surveys along the Mississippi River to study our metro area otter populations. For the past couple of years, we have been sharing our sightings of otter track and sign with the National Park Service through our iNaturalist project, the Minnesota Metro Otter Survey. Come join us as we search the shores of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers for signs of these inquisitive aquatic members of the weasel family, and learn to distinguish their tracks and sign from those of other animals.

This is an all-weather event and we spend time off trail. Please bring appropriate footwear and dress for several hours outdoors in whatever weather we may have that day.

We will gather at 9:00 in the fireplace room in the Visitor Center. We will head out on the trail about 9:20 and return to the visitor center about noon for a brief mapping exercise and wrap-up session. If you need to reach us the day of the outing, please call Jon's cell phone at 612-388-4700.

Note that you need a State Park pass to drive to the Visitor Center, but you can park for free at the Historic Fort Snelling visitor center. It is about a half-mile walk past the historic fort and down the hill to get to the State Park visitor center. The Historic Fort parking is located at 200 Tower Ave, St Paul, MN 55111

RSVPs are encouraged, but not required.

Click Here for Directions

Ft. Snelling Visitor Center


Trailing Practice at Cedar Creek: Sat, Feb 15

posted Jan 22, 2020, 11:16 AM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Jan 22, 2020, 11:17 AM ]

This months trailing practice will be at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve. Our plan is to look for carnivore trails to follow. As we know from our wildlife tracking surveys, Cedar Creek supports a diversity of carnivores including coyotes, foxes, fisher and, at least some of the time, a wolf. If snow conditions are favorable, we will follow fresh carnivore trails to get a sense of how the animal is using the landscape.

Saturday, February 15
9:00 am - 1:00 pm

We will meet in Lindeman Lab
Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve
2660 Fawn Lake Dr NE, Bethel, Minnesota 55005


Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve is a 5,400 acre experimental ecological reserve operated by the University of Minnesota. It is located about 35 miles north of Minneapolis and St. Paul, just east of Bethel. Laying at the boundary between prairie and forest, Cedar Creek is a mosaic of uplands dominated by oak savanna, prairie, hardwood forest, pine forests, and abandoned agricultural fields and of lowlands comprised of ash and cedar swamps, acid bogs, marshes, and sedge meadows.

This is an all-weather event and we spend time off trail, perhaps literally walking on thin ice. Please bring appropriate gear and dress for several hours outdoors in whatever weather we may have that day.

We will gather at 9:00 at Lindeman Lab do our welcomes and get organized before heading out on the trail. If you need to reach us the day of the outing, please call Jon's cell at 612-388-4700. Please note that cell reception may be spotty and I will have my phone on silent once we are on a trail.

RSVPs are encouraged.

For a map & directions to Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, click here

Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve




February Bird Languge Gathering

posted Jan 6, 2020, 11:26 AM by Jonathan Poppele   [ updated Jan 6, 2020, 11:26 AM ]

Please join us for our next Bird Language Gathering 

Sunday, February 2     
9:00 - 1:00 

Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center
3815 American Blvd E
Bloomington, MN 55425

Registration for these gatherings is encouraged, but not required. Feel free to drop by--and it would be great to know that you are coming!

Birds talk to each other. We can learn to understand it. And it's fun!

The first week of February marks mid-winter--the half-way point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. Chickadees and nuthatches are still moving about in their winter feeding flocks. The robins are still feeding high in the canopy. But owls are beginning to nest--and the songbirds will be keeping an eye on them. Come join us as we spread out on the slopes above the Minnesota river to eavesdrop on the birds and listen to what they are saying about this most unusual winter.

What should I bring?

Bring what you need to be comfortable sitting still, outside on the ground for an extended period of time—perhaps as long as an hour. You will also need something to take notes on. You do not need to have binoculars, but there is no harm in bringing a pair if you would like. Here are a few recommended and optional items to bring:

Recommended:

Note pad & pencil
Ground cloth, blanket or camp-chair
Warm clothing for sitting still outside

Optional:
Water bottle
Snack
Binoculars

Sign me up!

Registration is encouraged, but not required. Feel free to drop in and join us—and it would be great to know you are coming! If you have any questions, or to register for the event:

For a map & directions click here

Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge



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